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trading environment which the soldiers and police entering the service -- to give them some capacity initially to read and write and to make their numbers at first grade level -- havey over half of the asnf the capacity to read in the first grade level. to continue to emphasize the continued learning of the afghan soldiers and police threw up a period of time of their enlistment. this becomes not just an initiative which is useful for military and police operations, it is an initiative that has the potential to change society in many suspects -- in many respects. this has the potential for some pretty dramatic change. >> across the country i think there were other important outcomes of where we found the asnf in 2011 to where we are today. the securing of large segments of the population -- you wrote about it with michelle in a very good piece with respect to what you discovered. i travel inis when my battlefield circulation during the final months in afghanistan i tended to visit more of the afghan forces that our forces. i wanted to see how they were doing, how their command in con
in that environment. in fact, the plaintiff, the proponents' expert, mr. blankenhorn, testified that the children in those relationships would be better off. that we would be a better country, we would be closer to the american ideal, if same-sex marriage were permitted. now, it's easy to say those things. that you have to have, you have a better situation where a child is in, with a, with a mother and a father, but allowing, the other problem with that is that the, the remedy doesn't fit the so-called problem. in other words, restricting marriage to people of opposite sex doesn't mean that there won't be people in same-sex marriages. that california permits that. and the court, there is something like 37,000 children in same-sex households in california today. there are also 18,000 same-sex marriages which are not at issue in this case. it's easy to say that children would be better off in that relationship but if you have heterosexual relationships permitted in california and marriages between persons of the same sex, it doesn't change where the children will be raised. if a child is a product
. that is operated on by the environment and health choices. the genome, now revealing a lot of its secrets to us, is helping us to nail down what that heredity looks like and how we may learn enough about it to influence outcomes, so if you are born with a high risk of alzheimer's, maybe there is something you can do about it before you get the disease. >> when you sent christopher hitchens, what did he do in st. louis? >> he was examined by the cancer experts. they conducted dna analysis from his blood, and that could tell you the dna he was born with, and then they could look at the specific dna in the cancer cells.cancer is a disease in the genome. cancer comes about because of mistakes in the dna you are born with, causing them to grow when they should not, and in his cancer genome, they found a dozen or so mistakes that were acquired during life that were driving those cells to grow, and at least one of those not previously described suggested the possibility of using a therapy you would not normally have contemplated for esophageal cancer, so there was a chance to try something that was ra
relationship with the environment and always race up and praise the good. et us pay rightful homage to honor excellence and achievement, struggle and resilience. he taught us at the heart of our history is the constant all to reject the catechism of human possibilities taught to us every day. indeed he said, at this moment and always black people must begin to do the very things they have been taught they cannot do. standing strong in our history, for i us study well quote truth comes to us from the path like fwoled washed down from the mountains. and so our history is a very important thing. i'd like to frame it and again by quoting from a sake credit text which says let's do things rejoice for surely humans have been chose on the bring good into the world and this is a fundamental mission and meaning . -- in human life. are then constantly obligated to increase good in the world and not let my good be lost. in this period of crisis, confrontation war and waste, suffering. there is no greater challenge nor any greater responsibility for us as an african people in honoring our history to c
. they will certify the platform, operator, in many cases operational environment. fairly confident that that will lead to improvements, standards that need to be created. >> most definitely. there are 50 different entries that have been petitioned from 37 different states that are involved. in the involved reauthorization bill that you quoted are being funded by the states themselves from certification from the faa. in the future you may see every state could have their own test site in error -- in order to be able to ensure the technology being deployed is in fact say. some proponents of drones, drowned technology have argued current safeguards provided -- drone technology have argued current safeguards provided a sufficient level of technology. we have on the books, walls we are ready have on the books related to other technologies that can overlap and include this type of technology. remedies that provide similar of it -- civil remedies for violations of the loss. some have suggested the legal protection should apply leg ally to drones. sufficientey may be to alleviate problems
people together. partly it was the environment and the sicks that we had to confront -- circumstances that we had to cold front. as nk what has changed is she said we would work longer weeks and people were there for longer periods of time. the venues for communication were at hand. she will remember this well. we used to have two lunch tables that were just for senators and you sit family style. people would have lunch together. for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we getting together and one was around our spouses and we would salute our spouses. we would do things like that. people now leave washington more routinely on thursday or fridays and they don't come back until monday or tuesday. you are left to combovepb on wednesday. you condition govern a country as big and sophisticated a this is. they were in session for 11 days in february. partly, we have to ground the airplane. you have to stay here. i like the suggestion that maybe what we out to do is have blocks of time where you don't go home. you're there from january to june then
and an environment that celebrates your coming to our state and joining us. my focus for a long time has been, and i think... all of us, should be on economic growth. and ensuring the economic growth and our country return to historic levels and remains strong going forward. the question i would like to pose to both mr. horton and mr. parker focuses on the impact of this merger on growth, both from the perspective of the great many employees of both companies and from the perspective of consumers. by askingke to start the american ordered in texas which has a great many jobs that we are grateful for but american has challenging financial circumstances in recent years. i would like to get your views both on the negative impact that would flow to american disapproval -- this murder were not approved. it is widely expected to be approved by would like your repercussions if it were not and on the flip side, the positive benefits to the many thousands of men and women who worked at american right now if this merger is approved. >> thank you, senator. i would also like to welcome doug parker to the great
. particularly on the issues that she knew a lot about, which in alaska, are energy and the environment. and so when i got back, after that, i decided i would write a story about her. i mean, i heard a little bit about her. you don't hear much about alaska politics down here, for heaven's sake. she had run against the incumbent governor, republican, had defeated in the primarily then won the election in 2006 which was not a good republican year, but alaska is a pretty republican state and she won. so there she was in 2007. so i came back. i interviewed a bunch of people by phone and talked to her twice. i interviewed her twice on the phone and wrote a piece for "the weekly standard" about sarah palin. it was the first piece written about her in the national magazine in the united states. i don't go around bragging that i discovered her. >> the reason i ask you about this is here's "the weekly standard" magazine. this is a recent issue. most weeks, how many pages? 36 or so. >> 36 or 40. >> when did you know that column might have had an impact, led eventually to john mccain choosing her as vice
because of the environment -- involvement of all of the united states. will want toca sustain that and renew it. we are very pleased president obama and his administration have been so open, so available, and so encouraging. that caters to people with different traditions and cultures and aspirations. there is more that unites us than what divides us. it is the responsibility of those of us who have the privilege of holding political office to the -- to defend, under pennsylvania, and reinforce principles, values, and institutions, to show real leadership where real leadership is demanded. is characterized by openness, respect, and the wish to harness and nurture relationships with those within troubled communities to have the will and ability to walk to resolve issues peacefully using politics to succeed where violence never can. in the drafting of the budget we wereeuropean union, able to get included in their for expenditure on peace projects and divided lines in fragile communities in areas of northern island where young pennsylvania -- young men in particular have been le
for a strong working environment for middle class. we have a different vision on how to get there. one is a government run or government -- where things are dictated from healthcare to regulations. those are the kinds of things i believe stifle growth. i'm part of our freshman group working on regulatory reform. we are going to talk about that. is not take away the ability for someone to take away the pea, -- epa, but it helps those affected by it. there are real business affected. regulations are cutting -- the best way to help this country is to get washington in that so that it is -- so our free-trade agreements can work, so that our products can be sold overseas. free-trade trade is what we need to be part of. follow up onter, your syrian comments, "so you are against sending troops to syria?" said. that's not what i we have to figure out what is the proper role for us to play in syria. again, a comment i heard this morning -- what do we have a un for if it is completely useless ? i agree that right now, the un is basically useless in this situation. here is one thing that is ,mazi
. but this is what you expect from the federal government. your education, roads, bridges, a healthy environment, and what's mandated by the constitution, our armed forces to protect us. but this is where it gets really scary. all of this blue part here for medicare, social security is what we take in. in other words, all of our cash on hand, if you will, the money that you pay the federal government every time you get a paycheck or pay your income taxes, this is all devoted to medicare, medicaid, social security. in other words, everything else, your education, the environment, our roads, bridges, ports, armed forces all of that money to pay for that basically is borrowed. it's just borrowed, or worse just printed. this is the sad reality that we are facing today. but with republican house leadership and working with democrats who are actually willing to come to the table and compromise and not just work with us, work for you, we can save social security and medicare. by the way, when you hear democrats, or see the videos of them throwing your grandmother off a cliff or telling you that republi
environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? or a seven-day, 165-day, a one- day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up with the right answer. >> as you went through the releases and you sit here today, do you
. it addresses the need for a national military strategy to reflect the global security environment. the military, and the growing budget, currently the current strategy as well. starting with the strategic guidance issued in january 2012. it seems that we are falling into a trap of creating strategies entirely on how quickly we can cut defense budgets rather than as a result give an honest assessment. i am very much concerned. i always thought that the major mission of the federal government is to protect the homeland. we have to get back to that mentality and recognize the threat and you guys are in the right position to do that. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator. admiral? >> chairman, ranking member, members of the committee. thank you very much for taking time to hear from myself, general jacoby and general kelly. i always say that i feel safe when i'm with a big marine general and a big army general. it is probably the safest and i could be up your wet. thank you for having us and putting us together for this panel. as the chairman mentioned, rounding out for years in my curren
of the internet has produced an environment in which many people spend many hours each day online. 's this context, a person electronics communications encompass much more than in 1986. 2013, a person's the electronic communications encompass much more than in 2000 when congress acknowledge that must -- much had changed. a reform must be undertaken so that, despite the evolution of technology and its use in the world, the constitutional protections will endure. to advance ofded the goal of supporting the goal of new technologies and services. those must be and will be upheld as this lot is improved. there are many investigations in which it is working well. pedophiles who sexually assault children and put videos on the internet arethe becoming increasingly savvy. investigators use court orders under ecpa to identify these offenders to uncover caches of child pornography stored remotely in the cloud. ecpa reform is one of the top priorities. technology will help us solve many of the pressing problems our nation currently facing. we need to make sure our efforts are focused on creating incentives th
environment may also be may, in, such that we the future, rely, as i mentioned at oxford and here again today, on more traditional means of counter-terrorism. it really is the case that armed conflict, targeted legal force, should be regarded as extraordinary and an extraordinary state of affairs to deal with an existing threat came to government grapple with over 12 years ago. almost 12 years ago. i think there is a current debate that deserves a lot of attention, and people in congress, in washington, need to have this discussion, but as i tried to lay out this morning, i see some real practical legal problems. i will take one more question. yes, sir, gentleman in the red tie. i am sorry i missed anyone who has had their hand up. >> i wonder if you could say a of of about the capture wing the test. separately and operating question, and how you create incentive for agencies to develop a greater ability to capture in the future? >> thank you for asking that. i fail to make a point that i wanted to make earlier, which is that when you talk about talk feasibility of capture, those are not nece
people together. i think partly it was the circumstances and the environment we had to confront. devissive had very times. the schedule has changed a lot. we would work longer weeks and people were there for a longer period of time. the venues for communication were much more readily at hand. we had -- we used to have two lunch tables that are just for senators and you'd is it family style and people would have lunch together. and for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we get together and one was around our spouses and we'd salute or spouse. we'd do things like that. but i think the single biggest thing people leave washington so much more routinely on thursday or friday and don't come back till monday or tuesday and you are left to govern on wednesday. you can't govern a country as big and sophisticated as this one is one or two days a week. they have been in session 11 days in february which we've got to ground the airplane. we're going to have to say you're going to have to stay here. maybe what we ought to do is have blocks of tim
groups based in san francisco arguing that electric lights will endanger the environment and we'll have at least three lawyers running ads that say you can be killed by electricity. if someone tries to put electricity if n your house call us and we'll sue them for you. both parties are prisoners of the past. they are trapped in the ideas nd mind set. they they are all trapped in the age of candles. the first effort in electric light was 1800. in 189 thomas edson's laboratory had the first successful electric light. it lasted 13.5 hours. within a few months, edson hit and using carbonized bamboo the first practical light lasted 1,200 hours. this is the spirit we have lost. it seems determined to avoid thinking about it. edson said "we will make electricity so cheap that only the rich will burn candles." [laughter] [applause] i want to tell you that i've been trying to get the house of representatives to understand they can video v a hearing every week on the future and every committee and sub committee. they can be contrasting the burekic candle that are trapped with all the break throug
job they can to use the funds that we have been given wisely in an awfully unique budget environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? a one-ven-day, 165-day, day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up
duplicates environment. we are not implementing that. those models will be useful for future disasters. we have a template for the way to bring those together in a seamless way. to answer thehave question. that is not bad. i will be anxious as we move forward in as you finish your the subcommittee will have some further discussions about what is the net step to make sure it is more seamless and less complicated. >> thank you. the staff has done some good investigative work in the areas north of where i live. >> thank you very much. let me welcome to our witnesses. sandy did damage not only where it was the most visible on the east coast but in the great lakes as well. the forces were so huge that they caused damage to breakwaters and created a problem in harbor is in the great lakes. we have already seen massive damage on the great lakes. we are any disaster situation because of the drought and low water situation. lows,et new record hitting more than 2 feet below their average. this was a drought problem. lake superior is a foot below the long-term average. the army corps is predicting th
smoke. if you're in an environment were other people are smoking, you are breathing what they exhale. you're not doing it intentionally. he may not even be doing it knowingly with your being what they're putting out there. their smoking is not just harming them in terms of their potential of getting lung cancer, and is also affecting all the people who are breathing the same air. it's that idea that it's not aned that people they'll rescued us from the conundrum we are in. it is that we need to educate ourselves about where the sources of power are. we need to look not at the sneetches by sylvester mcmonkey mcbean to find out where the power is and to use that learning to distribute power in a very different way. thsi may sound -- this may sound -track so i have invited one of my former students who was a terrific didn't, someone who was president of his class at columbia -- a terrific students, who was president of his class at columbia, he cracked a whip from harvard law poetry, the 200 nuyorican slam winner. example ofbody an racial healing mercy so we can get the benefit of your
you'll see a depressed environment where the unemployment rate is over 26%, severe austerity cuts and overhauls of gutted worker benefits, safety net programs, harming seniors and the country's poorest populous, taxes on families an businesses have increased at a sharp rate and violent social unrest has become common place. most recently we've seen a proposal to bail out cyprus banks that could raid the savings account of its own population. these are the realities of debt-ridden countries. these are the realities of liberal policies that tax too much, spend too much, borrow too much and produce far too few jobs. we cannot afford the path that we're on. thankfully we have time to change. america's course and the house republican budget provides a so-year plan. it puts brakes on our spending levels, laying out a thoughtful program, reforms to ensure successful government services are solvent for generations to come, prioritizes a comprehensive restructuring of or tax code to simplify the system and improbables our fiscal system in a way -- improves our fiscal system in way that wou
money at this current time in this environment on capitol hill kind of goes against the grain but that is the key way that we can convert our good intentions to real, live aid and make a difference in people's lives on the ground. >> in my testimony are some of the ways we are rushing to help communities who are strained by the influx of refugees, and working with the governments of both these countries to provide additional support. it is an important question, one we are deeply focused on. >> thank you, mr. chairman and folks on the panel for your attendance. ambassador ford, i am wondering regarding the redline, i want some specifics -- what are the possible consequences, and i share your current skepticism, what are the range of possible consequences the american people can expect from the administration as a response? >> congressman, i really do not want to speculate here about hypothetical situations. what i do want to underline that the president has said there will be consequences and that we will seek strongly that the people who use chemical weapons be held accountab
strategic environment and about america's interest forward. finally i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of the most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. fors equally known brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his success in battles in the iraq war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain trus
collection . in conflict and post-conflict environments, this is especially vital as communities need reason to believe in the possibility of a better future and establish trust in opposition leadership . at usaid we are working quickly through usaid's office of transition initiatives to provide the soc with support to respond rapidly to immediate requests from local councils -- including the provision of emergency power, clean water, heaters, and educational supplies for children in strategically selected areas -- as well as support strategic transition initiatives that restore basic services . as ambassador ford has detailed, $54 million in non-lethal assistance, of the $115 million committed, is already at work through state and usaid- supported mechanisms to support, train, equip, and connect a network of civil society activists, civilian opposition leaders, and emergent democratic institutions . usaid has prioritized help for syrian women to play a meaningful role in the country's transition through training and support for coalition-building . working with the state department, usaid r
should. that centers provide a safe and welcoming homelike environment for veterans receiving home care, counseling, and group settings. veterans often feel very comfortable in that non-root -- non-bureaucratic environment. the mental health services closer to their homes, in certain situations they use madison to link to clinicians in medical centers. the va has done an excellent job in terms of telehealth in general. it is critical that they provide these options for care, making sure they remain available and the veterans know about them. i believe the next hearing that we will have deals without patients in general. you could have the best care in the world, but of the veteran does not know about it, it does no good at all. significant strides forward have been approved. we must do more to insure better prevention for today's service members tomorrow. the army, and i think we are all levelof the frightening of suicides within members of the armed services today. practically one per day. they have got to help us address this issue. based on the efforts of this committee, the behavior
maintain freedom of movement in a variety of complex environments around the globe. that is the joint operational access concept. a subset of that is how the navy and air force are collaborating to achieve that. the army and marine corps also have a role perry to your point about when i am in china about not aimed ate, is china. the united states has interests in the global commons, interest in maintaining freedom of movement, freedom of action, and the things we do at the development of technologies and tactics are fundamentally to guarantee that that freedom will continue to exist, regardless of who is threatening. may i ask you about what you consider is the impact of the non resolution of the palestinian best israeli conflict on the security of the gulf, and what specific challenge that iran presents now can be enhanced or ignored by the resolution of the conflict? >> identify yourself. >> thank you. peacel, the mideast process and those attempting or intending to continue to seek progress in that regard or dumb started, depending on who you are, is outside the realm of the milita
for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hackathons in tech-savvy cities like san francisco, austin, denver, and new york, to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we will embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we will upgrade gop. com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologists to join our efforts, and it can serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all this, we will enter 2014 and 2016 with a completely revitalized approach to campaign mechanics and tec
the environment and the poorest and the weakest. cansaid a little tenderness open up a horizon of hope. >> 34 years ago we began providing televised access to congress and the every day workings of the government. c-span, created in 1979 by america's cable companies and brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> the winners have been selected in this year's c-span's studentcam documentary competition on the theme "your message to the president.'' the grand prize winner was josh. first prize for his work on the economy and spending. one person prize with a documentary on transportation along with two other boys. see all the videos on our website. >> "washington journal" continues. host: merideth shiner is a staff writer for roll call. here's a headline from a recent piece -- are sixhere subcommittees and of those, three of them are not shared by women. threedition to those p chaired by women, three of them subcommittee is chaired by women. given the history of women in politics, it's a pretty remarkable thing. the other thing they are doing, they're not just coming to t
,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in constant fear of becoming collateral damage? today iraq is a sad shadow of a society that once boasted the best infrastructure in the region, instability and violence fester on this very day and now it teeters on the brink of an inevitable civil war. this is the legacy of our last 10 years, and i still don't understand why. i hope this anniversary will remind us that a whole new generation of veterans are waiting to help reintegrate into the civilian life. i believe it's time to elevate our level of commitment to these veterans. i'm introducing a bill to create a commission on veterans' care, to investigate what we as a society can do to help our men and women come home. i hope it will remind us that no lives, regardless of nationality, should be taken lightly. i hope it will remind us as to why the next time. and i hope it won't take another war to get that answer. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore:
, and epa, our corporations are putting more chemicals into our environment and into our food, making us sick. chemicals are chemicals. we have got to get our own -- this is democrats in indiana. caller: good morning. thank you for having me on. with president obama going to israel, the point i don't get still, what about the palestinians? is a separateic topic. this is u.s. policy towards syria. what do you think should be u.s. policy towards syria? caller: right now, i don't think we should be the police of the world. --should work to resolve this is an internal issue in syria. if he goes over the border, we should look into it. but we should deal not by ourselves but through other nations, the other arab nations. that is what they are there for. i am not quick about sending our troops to get killed and another war again. here john is a republican in the suburbs and alexandra, virginia. caller: good morning, thank you for taking my call. in regard to u.s. involvement in the commander testified to the senate last week or two is toogo that it propagated, the situation in we don't terms o
that could easily get caught and mangled in devices. monday equipment, the environment was a threat to children as well as the factories that put out the fumes and toxins. when inhaled these children would often result in illness, chronic conditions or disease. and harvesting crops in extreme temperatures during long hours were considered normal for children. the labor movement spearheaded the fight against the child labor practices that were going on. as early as 1836 we had union members of the national trades union convention made the first formal public proposal recommending that states establish a minimum age for factory work. that year massachusetts enacted the first state law restricting child labor for workers under 15. over the next several decades, the efforts of labor movements successfully achieved minimum age laws in other states and in 1881, the a.f.l. proposed a national law banning all children under 14 from employment. and in 1892, the democratic party adopted the a.f.l.'s child labor platform and began to push for a national child labor law. and finally in 1938, co
changing strategic environment, and about america's interests looking forward. finally, i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, and like most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside the conventional wisdom when the issue aren't said taking some risks with his own reputation. is one of mcmaster the most prominent of a very small, elite, important class of individuals who have earned the title of warrior soldier. he has been willing to critically examine the past and has done so with such power rather than end his military career, the work has advanced it. his ph.d. in pieces became a widely influential book beliesiction of duty: that led to vietnam." the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. he is equally known for achievement as a combat commander, earning a silver star for leadership in the 1991 gulf war, and even broader recognition for his enormously influential success in the ar in the calif iraq war. he went back and forth between field command and staff positions culminating in h
. the outcome of these particular systems are uknown for the environment. it would be beneficial to the assistance to knock down long- range missiles. host: are you familiar with this? guest: you probably want a meteorologist to talk about these questions. one comment i would make is that weather systems are so enormously powerful compared to even nuclear-weapons in terms of the amount of energy that the idea of modifying them is a daunting proposition. even if we are thinking in non- military terms about hurricanes, my understanding of the problem is that we are quite a ways away from being able to do that. one thing we do not understand is the implications of any intervention leawood try to carry out. these weather systems are intervention we would try to carry up. these budde systems are enormous. not since the debate is not important for the issue is irrelevant. i think we are a ways away from being able to do things with the weather. host: this point on our twitter host: let us go to ramie from baltimore, maryland. caller: a couple of quick points. i think we are talking abo
. over and over, our co-chairs heard of the need for an "environment of intellectual curiosity" that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hackathons in tech-savvy cities like san francisco, austin, denver, and new yorkto forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we will embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we will upgrade gop. com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologists to join our efforts, and it can serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all this, we will enter 2014 and 2
strategic environment and about america's interest looking forward. as aly i would add qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. theral mcmaster is one of most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. he is equally known for brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his iraqss in battles in the war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain
of it is done by private capital without government environment -- involvement. is moved towards the government having most of the responsibility in the mortgage market. it has moved in the last five years. we have to start moving that dial away from government and away from taxpayers and back towards more private capital participation. $10 trillion, and there is a lack of space. we can make that progress and have a vibrant role for government. i suggested that in thinking where that government role should be, it should the constructive for congress to begin with the traditional explicit government guarantee such as the fha program and the va program. those exist to provide guarantees. let us figure out where can preserve the market and what is left and what the government needs to do to support the rest. >> it does that make sense that we should figure out what governments role should be. if you agree that government has a role here. it does. how do we figure out how to make that work. how do we guarantee that the 30 year fixed mortgage will stay in place and available as an option to them? wi
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